Interview Magazine – Kellan Lutz

Actor, action-movie star, farmhand, Calvin Klein underwear model, and nascent motivational speaker, Kellan Lutz is the man of the moment. The determined 25-year-old Lutz has made a name for himself with roles as a cocky, good-looking jock with rich parents on CW’s 90210, a soldier stationed in Iraq in HBO’s Generation Kill (2008), and a vampire in the Twilight series—a trifecta of mainstream masculinity. He is a superhero-in-waiting, unbothered by an unbuttoned shirt, and thirsty for a franchise phenomenon of his own.

Born in North Dakota and raised in Arizona with frequent visits to the family farm in Iowa, Lutz has a backstory that is authentically rugged and thoroughly American—a Bruce Weber–esque narrative that became an actual Bruce Weber narrative in 2004 when Lutz appeared, photographed by Weber, on the cover of the A&F Quarterly magazine. But it’s Hollywood time now, and Lutz is hard at work. There’s this month’s A Nightmare on Elm Street remake; a turn as a hotheaded lacrosse player opposite fellow Twilight-er Ashley Greene in Warrior; the independent murder mystery Meskada with Nick Stahl and Grace Gummer; and then, most importantly, more Twilight (the third installment, Eclipse, is out in June). Lutz believes in paying it forward and the laws of attraction. Even stray pups follow him home.

MARK JACOBS: Hi, Kellan? Where are you right now?

KELLAN LUTZ: I am in my backyard in L.A. hanging out with my two dogs.

JACOBS: Who are your dogs?

LUTZ: Kola is a shepherd-husky mix I adopted from the Compton animal shelter. Kevin is the newest, most adorable member of our family. He’s a Chihuahua. I found him on the street when I came back from one of my trips.

JACOBS: You spent time on a dairy farm in Iowa while you were growing up?

LUTZ: Iowa is where the big farm was, where my grandparents lived. After my parents divorced, we would visit them. My mom would send me out to the pigpen, where we had these huge, huge pigs. I would stand there for six hours holding a hose, watering pigs. They’d dive in the mud and shake it off, and I’d go home covered in it. I loved the whole thing of getting wet and dirty and then getting in a warm bath.

JACOBS: You also have experience spraying crops and building silos. Are you aware of how this story reads in New York and L.A.? Anything involving uncontrived hard labor is irresistible to the style industry.

LUTZ: I’d rather do manual labor than sit behind a desk. And as my grandparents got older, I’d fly out there and help out around the farm. We’d tear barns down; we’d build barns. I’d rather be outside rolling hay or driving the tractors.

JACOBS: Then how did you choose Hollywood?

LUTZ: I have a lot of older brothers who messed up in different ways in my mother’s eyes. So I learned from all of their mistakes. I can’t go into detail, but while I was growing up, I always tried to make it a goal to relieve some of the stress my mother went through. I applied myself to school very diligently. I wanted to go out of state so I wouldn’t have to depend on my mother. And L.A., where my father lived, seemed to call to me.

JACOBS: Why acting?

LUTZ: In L.A., I was meeting people who were all actors. My mind started to open up to what acting was. I didn’t realize that Brad Pitt was a real person. I didn’t think he was a robot or a machine, but I thought you were just born into acting—that it’s a family tree, kind of like NASCAR. No one can just say, “Hey, I’m going to be a

NASCAR driver.” They need to have some way in. Once I was in L.A., I realized anyone could do this. Why not give it a shot? I started going to a ton of acting classes, and I found I had a real passion for it, probably the biggest passion I’ve ever had in my whole life. So I decided to put school aside, put all my scholarships aside, put everything that I worked hard on for my mother and myself aside, and pursue this roller-coaster ride.

JACOBS: How old were you when you got the -Abercrombie & Fitch cover?

LUTZ: Eighteen. I was actually working in L.A. at an Abercrombie to make friends. I had no friends.

JACOBS: On the sales floor?

LUTZ: I was selling clothes. But I believe my personality helped, because I was the worst folder. I just couldn’t care to do it. I felt like I had ADD. I would just goof around and shoot rubber bands everywhere. Somehow the manager didn’t fire me, and I became a greeter, when you have to stand outside, you know, topless, and kind of finagle people into the store. Then Abercrombie had an audition, and my agency sent me out. I met Bruce Weber, and they chose me. I wasn’t the strongest, most fit, best-looking guy on that shoot, but somehow Bruce put me on the cover. I was just lying on the grass playing with this beetle, and they used that shot. I was still working at the store when the magazine came out two months later. I was just very lucky, and that opened up doors to acting.

JACOBS: Unlike some actors, you don’t seem to have a need to distance yourself from modeling.

LUTZ: It’s weird that the world sees modeling as a negative. It just blows my mind how many people think that because I was a model, I think I’m pretty and that I can use my looks to get ahead. I’m not pretty!

JACOBS: You really don’t think you’re pretty?

LUTZ: It’s funny when people say you have sex appeal or call you the next Brad Pitt. I just laugh. I’m not that. I don’t want to be that. “You’re a sex icon.” Why? Because I played a vampire in a movie? It’s all very unearned. If I had the best freaking abs in the world or if I looked like Brad Pitt does in Fight Club [1999], then cool, but I’m not starving myself. I eat what I want, and I’m not a workout fiend. My genetics are good, but they aren’t crazy He-Man style. I don’t get it, but I appreciate it. [laughs]

JACOBS: And sometimes you just like to go on a shirtless run with your dog, and people need to deal with it.

LUTZ: I don’t see why it’s special. I know a lot of people who run shirtless because they don’t want their clothes to get sweaty. I’m just a normal person. And I have four paparazzi who sit outside my house all day.

JACOBS: Your humility is charming, but do you ever look at other guys going up for a role and think, “I can destroy you with my good looks”?

LUTZ: I love competition. I thrive on it. I love being able to win the room over before even walking through the door. When I was going out for Twilight, I was a big guy, especially after Generation Kill. I was close to 200 pounds and just all muscle. The character description was a big, bulky fighter, a wrestler, a bear of a guy with a smile. I walked in the waiting room and I noticed nine other actors, and half of them were trying to do push-ups, and half of them were trying to be all tough. I chuckled to myself. I’m very perceptive. I love seeing guys out of the corner of my eye be like, “Great.” Because they see a guy walking in who totally looks the role. It’s funny. I don’t try to be cocky, but I’m just very confident because I know I did all of my homework. I also really love, love, love doing character pieces. I love wearing wigs to auditions, even though sometimes they don’t work. I love trying to play the not-confident guy, the guy against my normal character, because that’s when real acting comes into play.

JACOBS: So you have four very different films coming up.

LUTZ: I’ve had a great run with great projects. Especially the new ones. I love this industry. It keeps you young; it really does.

JACOBS: You’re pretty young.

LUTZ: I’ll always see myself as young at heart. I mean, I’m 25, and some people see that as getting up there.

JACOBS: Who’s telling you you’re getting up there?

LUTZ: People are saying that you can’t play high school anymore and I’m like, “Thank god.” I want to be the Jason Bourne type. I don’t want to play high school.

JACOBS: You’re unapologetic about wanting to be an action star.

LUTZ: It’s all about goals. If you just take whatever comes to you, then you’re not going to get anywhere. The more you say it around town or in meetings, it starts happening. That’s what’s going on right now. People are seeing me as the guy who wants to get hurt, who wants to break a bone, get bruises. And that’s how it was growing up with six brothers. I got beat up, and I beat up people. I have no real tattoos. I wear my bruises and tons of scars as my -tattoos. And I’ve grown up loving action movies. I’d love to work with Sylvester Stallone, and I almost had the chance to in The Expendables [out August 2010], but that didn’t work out because of scheduling. I’d love to work with him and Mickey Rourke, Matt Damon, Daniel Craig, Jason Statham, Jet Li, Jean-Claude Van Damme. . . . Bloodsport [1988] was one of my favorite movies. I feel like there’s only so many roles out there and such a surplus of actors that if you don’t have a goal, you just get lost.

JACOBS: You’ve covered your bases. You even did a Hilary Duff video [“With Love”].

LUTZ: My agent and my girlfriend at the time both wanted me to go out for the audition. There’s a quote, I think it’s Wayne Gretzky, that says you miss 100 percent of the shots you never take. That’s so true. That’s why I love going out for any audition. I’m very professional, I study my stuff, I work on it, and even if I’m not right for the job, so what? I know I did my best.

JACOBS: You keep getting roles because you’re a talented actor and you’re dedicated to what you do.

LUTZ: I’ve got a lot to learn, and I’m very blessed to work with such talented actors. I’m nowhere near my goal. It’s all about applying yourself and taking time to work and train. I want to be doing this until the day I die. I want to be in movies and working with people who push me to be a better actor. That’s what I look forward to, and that’s what’s important to me. I just want to test out all that Kellan is and push him to the limits and create new Kellans.

Source: Interview Magazine

Published in: on 15/04/2010 at 19:24  Leave a Comment  

Twilight’s Shining Star, Ashley Greene

Once upon a time, the Twilight book series was the equivalent of literary crack for impressionable tweens, fantasizing about the forbidden love between vampire and delectable human.

Fast forward a couple years, and Twilight mania has swept the nation in cinematic form, allowing fans to finally assign faces to their beloved Edward Cullen and Bella Swan. Pandemonium continues to gain steam as fans young and old indulge their thirst for blood and romance and the excitement will surely be at an alltime high with the latest installment of the series, New Moon, set for release this November. But while veteran heartthrobs Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart have been at the forefront of the Twilight craze, stars like Ashley Greene, better known as the psychic, pixie-like vampire Alice Cullen in the film series, are still adapting to newfound fame. In fact, Greene, a Jacksonville native, was practically a newbie to the scene before landing the role that changed her life. Even our photo shoot, held at West Hollywood’s Coco de Ville / STK, was the starlet’s very first cover shoot. After a day spent amidst designer gowns, camera crews and the comic relief of Greene’s adorable pup, Marlo, Greene took a moment to come up for air and catch us up on life spent in Twilight.


Could you tell us about the new Twilight movie, New Moon?

It was fun for me because it was a little more in-depth for Alice’s character. It’s more about the angst part of it than the love story as far as Edward and Bella. Edward leaves Bella, so she kind of falls into a depression and gets close to Jacob, and discovers a couple more crazy things about the town. We had a blast filming. We got to go to Italy, which was amazing. It was a couple of us who got to go to Italy, and I was included. It was coming back to the people we got really close to in the movie before so it was like a little reunion. And Chris Weitz directed it, and he was incredible. I feel like the set was so chill and really comfortable, and it seemed like it was all very planned out and very put together so we weren’t going crazy and stressing out. I’m excited to see it all put together. I’m really confident that it will be good.

What was it like reuniting with the Twilight cast again?
Coming back to the second one was really great because we already had this relationship so we got to build on top of that. I feel like I was really close with a couple of people and then on the second one, I got close with a couple of different people, so it’s been really fun.

What was the process of being cast for the role of Alice? Were you familiar with the book series beforehand?
It was a really long, tedious process. I hadn’t read the books, but I read them because they wouldn’t release the script or breakdown. My manager told me to go into the audition and to do a good job and not to mess up because the casting directors were sticklers. So, I was like, “How am I supposed to do a good job? I don’t even know what I’m supposed to be playing!” I originally auditioned for Bella, and so I read the first book and kind of fell in love with it. I went in and auditioned and actually they called me back in and said, “No, you’re not right for Bella,” so I was bummed, and then they brought me back for Alice. I worked more on it – that was all I did for a couple of days before I went in. I came in probably like five times before I actually got the role – and then I went home for Christmas and literally just had to wait and wait. I thought that I didn’t get it again, and then I got the call that I was Alice and I freaked out and called my dad and mom.

Did you have any idea, going into it, that it would have this much fan appeal? Did you feel any pressure to deliver, or did that just develop over the course of making the film and its release?
I did because it was really my first film where I had a bigger part and was a studio thing – I was nervous. I think I was more nervous than most of the cast because it was my first thing. It definitely kept building and turned into kind of a different type of nervousness. We knew that it was probably going to go to theaters because so
many people love the books, and in the course of filming we realized that it probably wasn’t just going to go to theaters, it was going to do quite well. Then [the film] opened really, really huge, which was incredible.

Do you tend to have more guy fans or more girl “tween” fans?
I definitely get more girls. There’s been guys – I’m used to the girls, so with the guys I’m kind of awkward, I feel like. But, some of them are really sweet.

Do you prefer that people come up to you and say something when you’re recognized? That’s something fans always wonder.
Before, it was just like one or two people and I totally would rather them come up [to me] because I think it’s really sweet. They say hello and I go back to what I’m doing and it’s better than having them just stare the whole time because then you feel like you’re being watched and then you’re not really comfortable. But, it’s getting to be more and more people, so I don’t know. If everyone wants to come up and say hello… I guess I’m going to leave it up to them. It’s working fine now. I’m not going mess up the process.

What do you make of this Robert Pattinson craze? It’s starting to get to the point where the pandemonium is putting him in dangerous situations. What’s your take on that?
It’s sad for Rob! It’s a hard thing because we absolutely adore our fans, and he does too, and they helped us get to where we are now so you have to be thankful for that. I applaud him – with my fan encounters, there’s a process. It’s kind of like this chisel effect where there’s one and then it’s two and then it’s five, so I was kind of able to ace it. But he got slapped with 25,000 screaming girls so I definitely think he’s taking it in stride. They love him so much and I know they don’t want to hurt him, but people just don’t realize that when they’re that many people coming with a force, it can be very dangerous sometimes.

Now that you are in the public eye, how do you deal with people speculating about your personal life all the time?
It’s kind of laughable because it’s amazing that people are so intrigued by who I have lunch with and whatnot. This is my thing: If I was in a relationship with someone that I really cared about, it would upset me if they speculated something about me and someone else because that other person has to read it. That’s the part which I haven’t encountered yet because I’m not in a relationship, but I’m just waiting for it – and then I’m sure I’ll hate it. It’s something I have to get used to, I guess. It’s all apart of this job. It’s like the little fine print of dating me – “You will now be thrown into this Twilight whirlwind.” The fans embrace everything that we do, so if I started dating some guy they would probably embrace him too.

How has it been with the other Twilight castmates? Is there anyone on set that you happen to be closer with?
Kellan [Lutz] and I are very close. I have different relationships with different people – and it’s really great, I kind of get the best of everything. Rachelle [Lefevre] and I have this, like, zest for life. She and I can just go and have a glass of wine and unwind, and we work out together and stuff like that so she and I have that kind of relationship – I think we’re both easygoing, fun people. Kristen [Stewart] and I recently got closer. I feel like in the first film, we were friends, but with our schedule we were never in the same place at the same time. So, with the second one, it was more intimate as far as the amount of people involved. After the first week or two of production, it was just me, Kristen, Rob and Taylor [Lautner], and then Rachelle was there for a little bit. Taylor’s super, super sweet, and Jackson [Rathbone], I adore. I love them all. They’re great.

Do you ever worry about being always thought of as Alice Cullen when you go off to make your other film projects? What kind of other projects are you hoping to do?
Maybe Kristen and Rob will kind of have a little bit more of a shadow behind them that always links them to Twilight, but Alice is a vampire, yes, but she has this human heart. She’s really lovable and really likable, sort of
like the best friend, and so I think that might help me in the other films. I think the fans already love me and love Alice. I think it’s a positive. I don’t think I’m going to be pigeonholed. If I always played the hot, stupid chick, then I might be pigeonholed as that. I get to kind of choose my films, which hopefully I will choose wisely and
build off of that versus pissing the fans off. I want to do an action film just because there’s already a bit of action in Twilight, and when I did it I absolutely took to it and loved it.

When we see these other film series based off of books, like Harry Potter, that have gone on and on with multiple installments of the films – is that now something that you’re totally prepared to take on?
Yeah. I know Harry Potter went on – it’s still going on – for a really long time. These kids basically grew up in these films. But with ours, we can’t age, so that’s the big difference. We have to get [the films] done. We filmed the second one and we’re about to jump into the third. I’m not sure about the fourth one yet – but I’m assuming that we’re going to get that one done in a timely manner as well. I think we’ll film them, and then how they want to release them is up to their discretion. At least we’ll be able to have this Twilight force behind us for a while, but I think the filming will be done fairly soon. So, we’ll get to have the best of both worlds because we’ll actually be free to film other projects in between. That’s the other thing that I think is huge with Twilight – usually people don’t have the time or are not allowed to contractually do other films, but they’re letting us do other films in between.


When you’re not filming, what do you do for fun?

I definitely try to make it home. I actually have my family fly out, and I have a couple of Florida friends fly out sometimes, and then I have a best friend or two in L.A. I just try hanging out and spending time with my friends – I try and live a normal lifestyle.

What would be your ideal Saturday night?
Me and my friends are really big on doing game nights. We just grab a couple of games and sometimes we order in or sometimes we just get a bunch of cheese and crackers and stuff like that or cook dinner, and just hang out and play games.

By Jillian Gordon

Source: Saturday Night Magazine

Published in: on 23/09/2009 at 20:31  Leave a Comment  

Dazed & Confused / Young Blood: Kristen Stewart

Dazed Digital: You are in the midst of becoming a huge star. There’s a truckload of paparazzi outside the door right now.
Kristen Stewart: Yeah, but you can’t think about it too much because if you think about it too much it is this weird and dreamy fantasy land – you think – ‘ what the hell absurd thing are we doing at 3 o’clock in the morning, with 300 people- pretending to be other people, what the fuck are we doing?


DD: The paparazzi thing is only since Twilight, right?

Kristen Stewart: Yeah since Twilight. That’s the only reason they’re out there. They find out where I am from the Internet – from Twitter, man! Anyone who wants to know where I am at any given time just has to go on Twitter, it’s so ridiculous!

DD: I assume playing Joan Jett is a lot different experience from Twilight?
Kristen Stewart: It’s so much fun. She’s the ultimate badass. She was the first woman to start her own record label. Everybody threw her out after the Runaways and was like, ‘Sorry girl, your shticks over’, she was like ‘No, the message stays the same people still want to hear it.’
Who the fuck did that before her? The music industry is brutal. Once there’s one wave, one explosion of a type of music, everyone jumps on the bandwagon and tries to emulate that, so there’s a bunch of shitty versions of other bands. So there’s like shitty versions of everybody!

DD: You identify with this role in more ways than one, I’m sure. The film and music industry are not so far apart.
Kristen Stewart: Yeah, it’s been awesome working on this. I’ve gotten to do a lot of great roles recently. I just made a film in New Orleans- and its going to sound funny because I play a 16 year old street kid prostitute stripper – but it’s the one film so far I mostly identify with. I play such a child, like she has the emotional stability of a 5 year old; she’s in her own little world that she had to close off at a certain point. She’s at that point where she’s not quite over the edge like a lot of those people, and I met a lot of them in New Orleans, talking to people who had done the job for so long.
They’re gone. Like I hate to say that, there is a part of them that is dead inside and it is so sad they can still live a happy life or whatever, but that part is. So she’s not dead, she’s still whole. She’s just really broken and she needs to be put back together, and she needs this guy. James Gandolfini plays this plumber who is grieving the loss of his daughter and is dead inside as well, so she is sort of the catalyst of his awakening and subsequent reuniting with his wife, like she comes out of the house after 8 years. Like this vulgar really fully kid who has her own problems greater than theirs ends up helping to get them to a place where they can continue their lives.
It was the greatest experience on a movie I have ever had. Everyone was tight and it was the greatest crew, Jake Scott, the director, is Ridley Scott’s son. For some reason on that one, I didn’t stop thinking all day. Now, keep in mind, I had a perfect upbringing, but I know what that feels in some way, to be this character. It was really hard. But they’re really funny and they make the most of it. They’re really great characters.


DD: Is that the best thing about being an actress, playing roles like that.

Kristen Stewart: That and also I meet so many amazing people and I get to work with my friends.

DD: You have any aspirations to do anything else?
Kristen Stewart: I know that will just naturally become other things, other than just acting in movies. I don’t know what the fuck I’m going to do. I write shit or whatever. I am going to make my own movies with my friends, absolutely, and I might not only act in them. But really? I love this, I love what I do, I am definitely going to keep doing it if I feel this way about it. That could stop, but until then, I’m just going to just write, make movies, play music.

Source: Dazed Digital

Published in: on 19/08/2009 at 21:23  Leave a Comment  

‘Twilight’ set returns to Vancouver

Twihards around the world are turning their gazes back to Vancouver as Robert Pattinson, Kristen Stewart and the Twilight team return to the city Aug. 17 to shoot Eclipse.

Pattinson spent the summer on the French Riviera at Cannes, then in New York City shooting the teary romance Remember Me with Lost hottie Emilie de Ravin. Meanwhile Stewart shot the Joan Jett biopic, The Runaways, in Los Angeles this summer.

But the moody climes of southwest British Columbia are beckoning the duo back to roam the rainforests and urban alleys to shoot the third of Stephenie Meyers’ wildly popular Twilight series. (The second in the series, New Moon, opens this fall.)

Twifans want to know: Where in and around Vancouver are the stars going to land? What locations will host the vampires’ lusty adventures and his prey’s tremulous urges?

Naturally, location managers shy away from revealing to the media, as well as devotees, where they will shoot scenes in public places.

Eclipse locales will be guarded as closely as the Crown Jewels, because once word gets out, those sites will be swarmed with you know who.

Source: Canada.com

Published in: on 02/08/2009 at 19:11  Leave a Comment  

Interview Magazine – Taylor Lautner

When rumors surfaced last year that 17-year-old Taylor Lautner would not appear in the Twilight sequel because he was too physically slight to portray a bookworm-turned-werewolf, a great shriek rose from Fangirl Island. “Noooooo!!” wrote one obsessive on a Twilight discussion board. “omg. Pleezze let Taylor come back,” implored another. Some were more militant: “If they don’t put him in . . . there will be a massive Twilight fan attack!”

The producers opted not to mess with their core constituency. While Twilight was ringing up $380 million at the box office and becoming one of the top pop-culture phenomena of the past year, Lautner was busy packing on 30 pounds of -muscle at the gym. His character, Jacob Black, the platonic best friend of heroine Bella Snow (played by Kristen Stewart), transforms in New Moon from a likable klutz into a member of a wolf pack. Likewise, the film gives Lautner a chance to bust out of more than his shirts, challenging co-star Robert Pattinson’s dominance of both the teen mags and the movie’s monster love-story narrative.

After an unusually chaotic post-release period that saw Pattinson shear off his -vampire hair (noooooo!), Stewart photographed on the steps of her L.A. apartment smoking what appeared to be weed, and director Catherine Hardwicke replaced by American Pie helmer Chris Weitz, the cast reunited—a lot more famous—in Vancouver last March to begin -filming New Moon. The sequel shakes up the central trio—teen vampire Edward (Pattinson), his devoted Bella, and her best friend Jacob—sending Edward packing, turning Jacob into a werewolf, and heating up the love–triangle element as Jacob makes a play for Bella in Edward’s absence. Frost/Nixon’s Michael Sheen joins the fray as a vampire leader, and the sequel’s scoreboard reads werewolves vs. vampires.

Lautner grew up in Michigan and L.A., a youthful karate star who transitioned at the age of 12 from martial arts to acting in benign cinematic family fare like The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl. He was excited to talk about shooting New Moon, dirt biking, his new set of muscles, and playing up the sexual tension.

MICHAEL MARTIN: How is the Twilight phenomenon sitting with you?

TAYLOR LAUTNER: It’s the weirdest thing. Nobody really saw it coming. I mean, we knew we were making a movie of a very popular book, but we didn’t know how well it was going to do. When it opened, it exploded, and that was not something any of us saw coming. Filming New Moon is a lot different than the first one because this time we know what we are getting into.

MARTIN: Do all the expectations psych you out?

LAUTNER: I don’t think so. It puts a little more pressure on us than it did before. But for the most part, it’s been a blast.

MARTIN: So what’s in store for Jacob?

LAUTNER: He’s a lot different than he was before. He transforms mid-story—in the first half, he’s Twilight Jacob. I’m wearing a wig. My character’s very clumsy, outgoing, and friendly. When he transforms into a werewolf, he becomes something very different. It’s like I’m playing a split personality. Which is tricky, because sometimes I’ve had to play pre- and post-transformation Jacob on the same day of filming.

MARTIN: Is the premise similar to the book’s?

LAUTNER: The coolest thing about the series is that we stay very true to the books; it would be silly for us not to, because the books are exactly what the fans want to see. There’s an action side to it, which I love, and there are werewolves now. There aren’t just vampires. There’s a wolf pack.

MARTIN: What does it mean to turn into a werewolf?

LAUTNER: I think the most important thing with Jacob is that pre-transformation, he’s clumsy. He trips over his own feet. As soon as he transforms, he’s very agile. At one point, he flings himself through Bella’s window and lands at her feet, and that’s the first time Bella realizes this is a new Jacob: He never used to be this agile. I loved bringing out that side of him. The bummer is, when he becomes a wolf, that’s not actually me. When he does the cool fight scenes, he’s transformed into CGI.

MARTIN: You had to bulk up for the part.

LAUTNER: Absolutely. As soon as I finished filming Twilight, I knew I had to get to work right away; there could be no waiting involved. The day I finished Twilight, I came home and started bulking up. For New Moon, I’m 30 pounds heavier than I was in Twilight.

MARTIN: Do you feel like you’re walking around in a different body?

LAUTNER: I don’t at all. I haven’t noticed much of a change. I grew out of a lot of my clothes, though. I went from a men’s small to a men’s large.

MARTIN: Are you turning more heads?

LAUTNER: I don’t know. I should pay more attention to that. I hope so.

MARTIN: What was your training regimen?

LAUTNER: I was in the gym five days a week, two hours a day. At one point, I was going seven days straight. I had put on a lot of weight, and then I started losing it drastically, so I was worried. It turned out I was overworking myself. My trainer told me that I couldn’t break a sweat, because I was burning more calories than I was putting on. The hardest thing for me was the eating. At one point I had to shove as much food in my body as possible to pack on calories. My trainer wanted me to do six meals a day and not go two hours without eating. If I would cheat on eating one day, I could tell—I’d drop a few pounds.

MARTIN: Are Twilight fans as intense as they seem?

LAUTNER: They are very intense, but it’s cool that they’re so dedicated and so passionate. They’re the reason we’re here doing this sequel. So I’m thankful for the fans. I like meeting them. But, yeah, they’re pretty intense. Sometimes it becomes a little overwhelming.

MARTIN: Do they scream and rend their garments?

LAUTNER: We’ve met many different fans: the criers, who come around quite often; the hyperventilators who stop breathing and have to have a medic come. We’ve definitely seen some passion.

MARTIN: How does it feel to be the source of that sort of worship?

LAUTNER: I don’t even know. I don’t know if it’s really hit me yet. They’re just passionate for the series and for the characters, and we’re just lucky enough to be a part of this. I don’t think it has much to do with me personally; it’s more because I’m playing the beloved Jacob Black.

MARTIN: Were you a Twilight fan before?

LAUTNER: I was not a vampire or werewolf fan at all. I’d never even heard of the series. I auditioned for the role, and as soon as I got it, I started reading the books. I’m not a reader, but I really did get hooked on them.

MARTIN: Do you hang out with Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart?

LAUTNER: The whole cast is really close. It would be difficult for our characters if we weren’t. It’s a love triangle, and we need to understand each other. So the fact that we’re close and can talk things through in rehearsals, and if we’re out at dinner, we’ll just randomly start talking about the scene we’re shooting the next day . . . If we weren’t able to do those things, I don’t know where we’d be.

MARTIN: What’s in store for that love triangle?

LAUTNER: Twilight develops the relationship between Edward and Bella. In New Moon, Edward leaves, and Bella needs someone to bring her out of this depression she’s in, so she turns to her best friend, Jacob. It looks like it could go past friends. Bella’s very confused. Jacob wants nothing more than to be more than friends. He wants Edward to get out of there so he can move in for the kill.

MARTIN: So to speak . . .

LAUTNER: Yeah. Bella’s torn. She’s still in love with Edward, but she’s kind of fallen for Jacob, too. When I read the books, I felt bad for Jacob, because he can’t have what he wants. I understand Jacob’s pain but also Bella’s pain—how she’s confused and torn between the two.

MARTIN: You understood that from personal experience?

LAUTNER: From getting into the character and being surrounded by these really talented actors.

MARTIN: What would you like to do next?

LAUTNER: I love action films. I’d love to do an action drama. I’m always looking to give my character something action-oriented to do.

MARTIN: Is the third Twilight movie happening, and are you in it?

LAUTNER: Yeah. We’re all staying focused on New Moon right now, but that’s in the back of our minds.

MARTIN: What would you be doing if not acting?

LAUTNER: I always played sports when I was young. I played football and baseball for eight years. I loved football. So maybe I’d be doing some kind of sport. I also loved writing and directing. So maybe that could be in my future too. I’d love to get into that.

MARTIN: You want to be a screenwriter?

LAUTNER: Possibly. Right now I’m an actor. But I could see that in my future.

MARTIN: You’ve got some time.

LAUTNER: Yeah, I’ve got a few years ahead of me.

Source: Interview Magazine

Published in: on 16/07/2009 at 20:29  Leave a Comment  

100 Monkeys Exclusive Interview

When we were growing up, we thought ten little monkeys could get themselves into enough trouble for all of us…jumping on the bed and whatnot.

But now there’s 100 Monkeys, and they’re just as impulsive and unpredictable. The West Coast band comprised of Jacksone Rathbone (a.k.a. Jasper Hale of the “Twilight” saga), Ben Graupner, Ben Johnson, and Jared Anderson has found success across the country with their unique improv style of music.

Categorized on their MySpace page as a combination of “Japanese classic music, 2-step, psychobilly” which may be good enough or equally perplexing descriptors as any, the 100 Monkeys are currently touring throughout the summer with their debut CD Monster De Lux.

Just listen for the shouted deluge of audience improv suggestions or follow the trail of over-excited, collapsed Twi-hards, and you’ll be sure to find them.

Meanwhile, StarShine caged the jovial, bantering Monkeys (sans Ben J.) for an exclusive interview in which they discuss stage life, Twilight mania, obscure global theorems, and humpback whales.

What’s the origin of the 100 Monkeys?

Jackson: The 100 Monkeys started with Ben G. and I–like 3 years ago–whenever he moved to L.A. We were roommates back in high school. We knew Ben J. back then, and we started the band as a two-man group just doing improv music and trying to get Ben J. out to Los Angeles to make some music with us. Along the way, we happened to meet up with Jared Anderson who we would jam with all the time. Now we all are together in harmony. It’s fantastic.

Ben G: It’s like an MTV reality show.

Would you ever do one of those?

Jackson: No, that would make even more drama out of what little drama there is.

Jared: If it was a Discovery Channel reality show, yes.

Speaking of the Discovery Channel, why did you choose to name the band after “The Hundredth Monkey Effect,” which per your MySpace page, “generally describes the instant, paranormal spreading of an idea or ability to the remainder of a population once a certain portion of that population has heard of the new idea or learned the new ability”?

Jackson: That was one part of it, and [that idea] if you get 100 monkeys in the room with 100 typewriters, eventually they’ll create the works of Shakespeare. (See: Infinite Monkey Theorem) It’s the certain style of music we make and the music we write.

If you came up with your own Monkey Effect, what idea would you like to impart on society?

Ben G: Wow!

Jackson: We’re really trying to get people into the Spencer Bell Memorial. (www.spencerbellmemorial.com) It’s a benefit for adrenal cancer research and our friend Spencer Bell, who was our greatest influence in all of our music. He passed away about three years ago, so we’re just working, trying to keep his memory alive and keep his music out to the masses. We were able to raise money to put out one of his albums, and we have 3 more because of the fan support that we’ve been getting. It’s just incredible.

Why have you chosen to use improv in your music?

Jared: I think because we started as actors, most of us, minus Ben J. Improv is part of acting, so we all love doing it. We play well off each other, and we do take straight-up audience suggestions and make up a song on the spot, even all the instrumental parts.

Just then, the sound of piano keys interrupts his thought as the boys chime in, singing and playing notes, “It’s a song that we’re singing for the very first time…” Over just as soon as it started, they jump back on the interview train –

Jackson: See, genius! Where inspiration takes you, it takes you hard. If you take the drummer and the drummer starts playing bass and the singer starts singing backup vocals, you find a whole new bunch of stuff in the music that you might not find if you didn’t allow yourself the freedom to change the lyrics once in a while or completely make up a song.

Jared: It’s called the 100 Monkeys Switcheroo.

Ben G: We increase each other’s talents.

Jackson: We all come from different backgrounds and ways of learning music. It’s really interesting, and it’s really cool to have that diversity ‘cause when it comes together, it creates this union of –

Jared: – magic. A union of magic.

Jackson: Sometimes it sounds awful…but still magic. Sometimes it sounds good. (laughs)

Can everyone play all of the instruments?

Ben G: Not yet, but almost. People have their strengths. Everybody specializes I think in probably two things.

Jackson: We wanna give the audience a show. We love our fans. We love performing, and we feel that when you come to our show, you’re gonna get to hear a song that’s never going to be played live again. People always come up to us at the end of shows requesting other improv songs.

Jared: I actually feel like we owe it to ‘em after a while because they’re like demanding, and I’m like, “I don’t know how!” I’m like, “Let’s just suck it up and learn it!”

Given that three out of the four of you are also actors, do you have a preference between music and acting?

Jackson: I wanna have my cake and eat it too. I wanna do both. I think the way we figure it, it feeds both sides of the creative process.

To feed the elephant in the room, Jackson, can you tease anything about “New Moon” for the yearning “Twilight” fans out there?

Jackson: It’s gonna be raging…action-packed, more steamy romance. You get to see a lot more crazy stuff happening. We went deeper into the world now, and it’s gonna be a fun thrill ride for everyone.

Also, filming recently wrapped in Pennsylvania for M. Night Shyamalan’s “The Last Airbender.” What was that experience like, Jackson?

Jackson: It’s been incredible, a great set. I really believe we’re making a film that’s going to be epic. It’s gonna move people. I think the movie’s gonna turn out beautiful.

The 100 Monkeys have performed with Rob Pattinson in the past. Any chance that’ll be a recurring collaboration?

Jackson: Well, I mean, Rob’s a busy guy…(laughs) We’ve had a few chances to play with him. He’s an awesome musician.

How has “Twilight” mania affected the band’s popularity?

Jackson: It’s definitely gotten us some attention, but I think the main thing is our lives shows. People get to –

Jared: – escape into a fun land. Enjoy good music.

Jackson: Yeah, we like to have a good time. That’s what we’re always trying to do – play music for as many people as possible.

Jared: Hopefully, they come in ready to rock out and have some fun. That’s all you can expect.

Ben G: If you scream loud enough, we’ll make up a song that you decide what it’s called. Things like guitar picks and sweat.

Jackson: We like to give things away a lot on stage.

Jared: Sometimes we bring monkeys and throw them into the crowd.

Jackson: By the way, Ben J. is an adamant whale enthusiast. I know that if he were here, he would want to mention something about preserving the humpback whale in particular. Just figured I’d throw that in there.

One thing’s for certain, you’ll never know what the 100 Monkeys will say…in person…or on stage.

Visit www.myspace.com/these100monkeys or www.100monkeysmusic.com for upcoming tour dates and information.

Source: StarShine Magazine

Published in: on 07/07/2009 at 19:17  Leave a Comment  

Exclusive: Peter Facinelli talks New Moon, Eclipse, Nurse Jackie, and more

Peter Facinelli  was kind enough to speak with me today about his work on The Twilight Saga: New Moon, Nurse Jackie, up-coming The Twilight Saga: Eclipse, and much more.

Though recovering from a bit of a cold, this self-proclaimed Twilight fan and film enthusiast was earnest and open about his work.

After a couple of weeks of constant Twittering, and the widely known win in a bet with Rob De Franco, Facinelli is still working out the details on how to handle the prize. He is still “just trying to figure out what to do for the day [June 30th] because I want to try and do some kind of charity event. I thought it might be a fun way to actually make it into something meaningful.”

While the day might already include the very charitable donation of Facinelli’s own actor’s chair to one lucky Twilight fan/Twitter follower, Rob DeFranco’s Hollywood Boulevard jig might not be all Twilight fans will see on June 30th, it seems.

I asked Facinelli if he was surprised at how much the bet took off after his initial few Twitters. Said he, “Yeah, I mean, Rob came over to my house and he saw the back of my chair and was like ‘Can I have that?’ And I said, ‘No,’ but he knows I like a good bet, so he said, ‘I’ll bet you for it.’ We kind of came up with this bet. It’s not like we sat around and planned some crazy thing, and then all of a sudden we threw it on the internet, and it kind of exploded. I know a lot of people had fun with it, and I was happy that people were. It was a very entertaining week.”

Also fun this week was the third episode of Facinelli’s newest show Nurse Jackie on Showtime – whose pilot broke Showtime’s own records and led to an immediate announcement of a second season. Said Facinelli about this news, he’s “pretty excited. I love working with Edie Falco. She’s an amazing actress, and a really sweet person. I mean, whenever you get to do more of what you love to do, it’s always great. When we did Twilight, I think our main goal was to hopefully be able to do more and we are.”

Indeed, they are. Having just wrapped The Twilight Saga: New Moon with director Chris Weitz, Facinelli is to be back on the Twilight set once again – this time with David Slade for The Twilight Saga: Eclipse. I asked Facinelli whether he was surprised at all that his work in Twilight has potentially led to a four-part film series.

“Well,” he said, “when we first shot it, you know, I think no one really knew that it was going to be this big. I think we were just hoping to satisfy the fans of the books, and we knew there was this underground following. Again, no one really knew it was going to snowball into this huge thing… kind of like my Twitter bet… No one knew it was going to snowball into that huge thing either.”

Facinelli also enjoyed his work on Nurse Jackie with director Steve Buscemi. “I’ve been a fan of Steve Buscemi’s for the longest time, so to be able to be directed by him was a real treat. I almost worked on a movie with him … and I was up for the lead role, and I ended up not being able to do it. And to work with him years later was pretty cool .. It was called Animal Factory.” He didn’t end up on the picture, he says, because “[Buscemi] went younger with the role. It was between me and Edward Furlong, and he went with Eddie … So, I was kind of bummed, but later on I got to work with him on Nurse Jackie, and we were excited to work together.”

Steve Buscemi and Edie Falco aren’t the only long-timer HBO/Showtime series alums, and this fact might be one that intimidates some, but Facinelli has a different perspective. “I’ve worked with a lot of great actors, so I don’t get intimidated by [them.] I get excited to work with great actors.”

When asked if there were any particular actors that he’d like to work with, Facinelli admitted “that’s a long list.” “I always wished I worked with Paul,” Facinelli said, “Paul Newman, but I never got the chance. Robert Redford would be my second. You know, I love Al Pacino and [Robert] DeNiro… they’re great. I think my favorite would be … if I had to pick … Sean Penn. I’d love to work with Sean Penn. Either way. As a director (with him directing me) or acting alongside him. I’m a huge fan of his and the work he’s done.”

Nurse Jackie, since being pitted for a second season reprisal, will begin filming this fall. Also filming this fall is The Twilight Saga: Eclipse, but Peter Facinelli is confident that both can be done harmoniously. According to him, “They’re starting in October some time, and I think we’re starting Eclipse in August, so if everything stays according to plan it’ll be close, but we’ll be able to squeeze both. The good news is that I’m not in every scene in Eclipse and I’m not in every scene in Nurse Jackie, so I’m sure I’ll be able to do both.”

Speaking of Eclipse, I asked Facinelli if there was anything about director David Slade that he looked forward to working with him for. Said he, “I’ve heard he’s very intense, and I heard he’s a great actor’s director, so I’m excited to work with him.”

The changed directorial hands, too, seems to be exciting to Facinelli. “Whenever I’ve done television (Six Feet Under, or Damages, or Nurse Jackie) we worked with different directors each episode,” Facinelli said, “so, it makes it interesting because they come in and it’s the same material, but you get a different perspective on it. And that’s how it’s been on this one too. Chris Weitz has brought his vision; Catherine Hardwicke had hers. And, now, we get to see what David Slade’s going to bring … It’s exciting.”

Though only contracted for Twilight, New Moon, and Eclipse, Facinelli also intends to reprise his role as Dr. Carlisle Cullen in The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, if it comes to fruition. Says he, “I’m a big fan of the series. I wish there were more!”

In our discussions here, I told him, we’ve bounced around the idea of a post-Breaking Dawn television series, and the witty Facinelli is on board for that as well, he says, “as long as it’s called the Carlisle Chronicles.” If only, huh?

Other projects in the works for Facinelli include, potentially, Thicker, which Facinelli tells us is based on a “short movie” of the same name. “I’m hoping they can get the money and shoot that because it’s a fun little short … Leslie Zemeckis (who is Robert Zemeckis’ wife) co-stars and is producing it. And Christopher Lloyd.”

Also in the works is one of Facinelli’s own near and dear projects called Loosies. About the film, Facinelli says, “it’s about a pick-pocket in New York, who lives this carefree lifestyle, kind of like the Steve McQueen type, and he ends up getting this girl pregnant, and his whole life gets thrown upside-down. He has to grow up and take some responsibility for his life, basically.” The script, he says, was his own penmanship, and he “was supposed to try and squeeze [it] in this summer, but the window got too small between going back to work on Eclipse, so I’m going to have to push that ’til next year.”

While another project may also be in the works for Facinelli, he says that if not, he will plan to attend Comic Con this year. Says he, “it sounds like fun. I didn’t go last year…”

Source: The Examiner.com

Published in: on 25/06/2009 at 21:48  Leave a Comment  

Jackson Rathbone talks women, cheating, and how to seal the deal for a second date with him!

Jackson Rathbone is a triple threat. An amazing actor, singer, and writer. Women can only imagine what Jackson might be looking for in a woman. Some might think that any woman he might take a second look at would have to be drop dead gorgeous. Wrong. Jackson opens up about his favorite features about women, dating advice, and how to seal the deal for a second date with him!

Gabrielle: What are qualities you look for in women?

Jackson: I look for a woman with a sincere smile and a love of the arts. I love being able to go out on crazy dates, like breaking into zoos after hours, so a woman who has a sense of adventure… but I also love a calm night of jamming on a beach at midnight with a bonfire, whiskey, and friends… so a woman who can hang in any situation and not get too clingy if I’m playing some music and spending time with my friends and family.

GC: In your opinion, what do men really notice about women?

JR: The way she carries herself. Many times, my friends and I will notice a girl who is beautiful, but just looks miserable in her demeanor. It’s a turn-off. Life’s too short.

GC: What is your ideal first date?

JR: Well, I live with the band I’m in, 100 Monkeys (100monkeysmusic.com), so I like to take a girl out to dinner alone, go for a walk and chat, and then come back to our “Monkey House” to see if she can hang with my friends/bandmates. If she’s cool to jam some tunes with us, shoot nerf guns at my bandmates’ heads, or at least not get offended when I pick up a guitar… then I know there’ll be a second date.

GC: What is a total deal-breaker?

JR: If a girl is involved with another guy. I don’t believe in the ideology of “if it’s a different area code, it’s not cheating,” I think that’s more of an “idiot-ology.” Too many times I’ve been hit on by a woman with a ring (engagement and/or wedding), and it disgusts me, to be frank. Even if a woman has a boyfriend she is about to break up with… to me, it’s wrong. I won’t even consider flirting with a woman unless she is completely single.

GC: What is your favorite feature about women?

JR: Everything. I am a lover, not a fighter. I don’t fuss over the fine points, I just love it all.

GC: How important is personality versus looks?

JR: I find the way that a woman walks, talks, and carries herself is more important to me than the way she dresses or make herself up. I don’t care how gorgeous she is if she knows it and shows it off too much; that woman is far too ostentatious and superficial for me. One of our band’s first singles is called “Ugly Girl” (available on iTunes) and it’s about a woman who sacrifices her personality for looks. To me, that makes any woman ugly.

GC: What’s sexier: A woman in a little black dress and heels, or a woman in sweat pants and a tank top?

JR: Depends what time of day. And where.

GC: In your opinion, what is the most important part of a relationship?

JR: Selflessness, honesty, and a healthy sexual attraction. I believe a sort of feral instinct takes place in any relationship that works… a sort of “pheromone cupid” strikes, if you will. From there, it’s all about keeping it honest and selfless. It takes two to tango, right?

GC: What is the worst dating advice you have ever taken?

JR: “Say whatever she wants to hear.” I forgot who told me that, but it’s complete bull-shenanigans. Trying to be what she wants is a terrible idea. I try to find a woman who I can be myself around, and who can be herself around me. I hate when relationships change people, but it happens… sometimes for good and sometimes for bad, but when two people fall in love and are still the same people, that’s true love. In my humble opinion.

GC: What first grabs your attention about a woman?

JR: Her eyes and her smile.

GC: Do you have any kind of hygiene regimen in the morning? Anything special you use on your skin, hair, etc?

JR: Haha! Nope. Just soap and water… I also brush my teeth with toothpaste, use deodorant, and I, occasionally, will shave.

GC: Do you prefer women with makeup or natural?

JR: Natural, mostly, but I’ve been known to be extremely attracted to the punk rock look. Though sometimes, it’s a little too much and you can’t tell how a woman will look when she wakes up; it’s really about whatever makeup makes her feel more like herself and more comfortable with who she is, not the other way around. In other words, a woman who defines her makeup and doesn’t let the makeup define her. Blonde or Brunette? —You forgot redhead. Tall or Petite? —In the words of Goldilocks, “just right.” Favorite eye color? —I’m color deficient… I like eyes that smile. Short hair or long hair? — I don’t have a preference, I guess… I’ve dated women with haircuts much shorter than my own and women with hair long enough to lasso the moon.

GC: Thank you Jackson!

JR: Thank you, Gabrielle!

Source: Examiner.com

Published in: on 24/06/2009 at 20:24  Leave a Comment  

Love gets complicated in Twilight sequel

By SUN MEDIA

Cue the hyperventilating, we have breaking Twilight news: “Rob’s not pregnant!”

This with a laugh from Montreal actress Rachelle Lefevre, well aware of the absurdity — and intensity — of the rumours surrounding the vampire book-to-film franchise and its breakout star, Robert Pattinson, the angular heartthrob with the bed-head and British accent.

Lefevre, who plays vicious blood-sucker Victoria in the adaptations of Stephenie Meyer’s bestsellers, is in Toronto shooting a movie opposite Kevin Spacey and prepping to present at Sunday’s MuchMusic Video Awards.

But the topic of The Twilight Saga: New Moon is never far behind.

The Vancouver-shot sequel to last year’s hit (worldwide gross: $382 million) opens Nov. 20, complicating the romance between star-crossed sex-abstainers vampire Edward Cullen (Pattinson) and mortal Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) with new characters (Frost/Nixon’s Michael Sheen and Dakota Fanning are introduced as members of the Volturi, an ancient vampire coven), a love triangle (created by returning Taylor Lautner as werewolf Jacob) and converging enemies.

At the centre of the pop-culture tsunami are Stewart and Pattinson, magazine cover mainstays whose real-life rapport (romance or no romance?) at times eclipses their fictional one.

“They have fantastic chemistry together on-screen and you know that’s the kind of thing that becomes the source of rumours,” Lefevre says.

“People want them to be together. People would love to hear that — that they fell in love on the set and so they read that into everything they see.

“But all I’ve seen are two people who have beautiful chemistry on-screen and are bonded. Kristen, before Twilight, already had a huge resume and had worked with some heavy-hitters, but she had also flown under the radar.

“And Rob, he was in Harry Potter (and the Goblet of Fire), so he had some experience with fame, but it was nothing remotely like this. So when two people go through that experience together — the fandom and everything — it’s going to bond them.”

How is Pattinson adjusting to life under the microscope?

“He’s got a really good sense of humour. I’ve seen him frazzled, but when there were eight paparazzi chasing you and it’s just you, it can be scary.”

Almost as frightening perhaps as switching directors mid-stream between sequels.

Usually when a film succeeds, a studio clings to its creator. But in the case of New Moon, Catherine Hardwicke is out, replaced by Chris Weitz (The Golden Compass).

“It could have been bad,” Lefevre admits. “But I think because Harry Potter went through it first to their benefit, we were like, ‘The Potter kids went through a director shift and they were okay, so we’ll be okay too.’

A third transition will happen later this year in Vancouver when another director, David Slade (30 Days of Night), takes the reins of the next sequel Eclipse.

“It’s perfect timing for David because Eclipse is darker than the other two. There’s more action. It’s not a horror movie, but it is darker.”

LIFE FOR LEFEVRE

Despite a high level of fandemonium, Twilight star Rachelle Lefevre she says so far she has had no outrageous encounters with the faithful to report. Even if being watched in public takes some getting used to.

“I walk down the street with my friends, feeling like I should be singing, ‘Somebody’s watching me,’ ” she says, breaking into a few bars of that 1980s pop song.

“But at the end of the day, I’m grateful for the whole thing. And the fans are sweet and loving. It’s like being sprinkled with the nicest bit of love every day.”

Source: 24 Hours

Published in: on 21/06/2009 at 15:00  Leave a Comment  

Daniel Cudmore: Lexicon New Moon Interview

How would you characterize the New Moon audition process?
It was very unexpected for me. I had auditioned for one character and was called about a call-back for another character which somehow I had no idea about. Fortunately, I couldn’t make the call-back and had a chance to get it right and put it on tape. A week later I got the good news.

How would you characterize the make-up and costuming process?  Some of the actors have had difficulty with the contacts.  Did you find them difficult to use?  Did the costume help you find the character?
I found the whole process a lot of fun, I wear contacts normally so it wasn’t uncomfortable. The whole costumes when put together were so cool, and really helped with getting right into that character. It also helped that my skin was pretty much the same color as a vampire’s after a nice Vancouver winter.

How did you and the other Volturi and Guard cast members build your character relationships?
Charlie Bewley and I met at a costume fitting and got together a few days later for a coffee to chat about New Moon   We both have a very similar background and outlook on life so we got along right away, which helped with our characters since they’ve had quite a long working relationship and haven’t gotten sick of each other yet.

How did you prepare for the role of Felix?  Did you focus on a specific trait or idea as you prepared? You have talked about building back story for Felix. Can you give us some insight into that process and how you translated that to your scenes?
I definitely worked on this character for a while, I really liked his animalistic side and how good he is at what he does. I also worked out that his rage comes from jealousy, not having a power like the rest in the coven and Aro’s fascination with Edward fuels it even more. It was a fun character to play.

When we interviewed Charlie Bewley, he spoke about how your characters have a tag-team type of relationship in the movie. How would you describe Felix and Demetri?
Haha, very much bad cop good cop, except I really never interrogate, just rip vampires apart. It’s a great system they have and it’s worked for a while now.

We understand that you have done a lot of stunt work in the past. What is the coolest/most challenging stunt you have ever done, and did you enjoy your stunt work in New Moon?
I have been fortunate enough to do a lot of stunt work which has been a lot of fun and helped a lot with the fight scene on New Moon. I think the coolest stunt so far is this fight scene. It’s great to be the actor and getting to do all the fight choreography helps with the performance and really makes me feel a part of this character. I can’t wait for people to see it, JJ Makaro and his team put together a really cool fight and Simon Burnett (Rob Pattinson’s double) did such a great job.

What parts of filming did you find challenging (i.e. filming in front of a green screen, the makeup)? What was most enjoyable?
I think the shoot went really smoothly, the only thing would have to be the costume being really warm, so the long days of action work were a little sweaty. But it was all worth it once we got to film in Italy, it was gorgeous over there.

You had, no doubt, seen footage of the Twilight fan mania at some time. You started out filming in relatively low-key Vancouver, and went on to film in Italy. Did you expect so many fans? How would you characterize the experience of filming in Italy?
Haha, I’ve never seen anything like that. I thought they would have no idea who I was, but wow I was wrong. Filming there was such a great experience, I’m very fortunate to get to do things like that, with a great cast and crew.

Many of your roles have been in fantasy-based films. Do you prefer that genre? What is your dream role? What are some of your upcoming projects? Are you looking forward to the other Twilight Saga films?
I think it’s a very cool genre since all the characters are so imaginative. I’ve always wanted to be in a Bond film, I’m a huge fan of 007 and one of these days I’d like to get in one. I’m not locked into anything yet, there are some things in the works but the next film starts so soon, I might not have time for anything else.

Do you have anything more that you’d like to share with Twilight fans?
Just that it’s so great to be attached to this project because the fans are so passionate about it which is great to see, and I hope everyone enjoys New Moon as much as I did to film it.

Source: Twilight Lexicon

Published in: on 21/06/2009 at 14:48  Leave a Comment