Dazed & Confused / Young Blood: Kristen Stewart

Dazed Digital: You are in the midst of becoming a huge star. There’s a truckload of paparazzi outside the door right now.
Kristen Stewart: Yeah, but you can’t think about it too much because if you think about it too much it is this weird and dreamy fantasy land – you think – ‘ what the hell absurd thing are we doing at 3 o’clock in the morning, with 300 people- pretending to be other people, what the fuck are we doing?


DD: The paparazzi thing is only since Twilight, right?

Kristen Stewart: Yeah since Twilight. That’s the only reason they’re out there. They find out where I am from the Internet – from Twitter, man! Anyone who wants to know where I am at any given time just has to go on Twitter, it’s so ridiculous!

DD: I assume playing Joan Jett is a lot different experience from Twilight?
Kristen Stewart: It’s so much fun. She’s the ultimate badass. She was the first woman to start her own record label. Everybody threw her out after the Runaways and was like, ‘Sorry girl, your shticks over’, she was like ‘No, the message stays the same people still want to hear it.’
Who the fuck did that before her? The music industry is brutal. Once there’s one wave, one explosion of a type of music, everyone jumps on the bandwagon and tries to emulate that, so there’s a bunch of shitty versions of other bands. So there’s like shitty versions of everybody!

DD: You identify with this role in more ways than one, I’m sure. The film and music industry are not so far apart.
Kristen Stewart: Yeah, it’s been awesome working on this. I’ve gotten to do a lot of great roles recently. I just made a film in New Orleans- and its going to sound funny because I play a 16 year old street kid prostitute stripper – but it’s the one film so far I mostly identify with. I play such a child, like she has the emotional stability of a 5 year old; she’s in her own little world that she had to close off at a certain point. She’s at that point where she’s not quite over the edge like a lot of those people, and I met a lot of them in New Orleans, talking to people who had done the job for so long.
They’re gone. Like I hate to say that, there is a part of them that is dead inside and it is so sad they can still live a happy life or whatever, but that part is. So she’s not dead, she’s still whole. She’s just really broken and she needs to be put back together, and she needs this guy. James Gandolfini plays this plumber who is grieving the loss of his daughter and is dead inside as well, so she is sort of the catalyst of his awakening and subsequent reuniting with his wife, like she comes out of the house after 8 years. Like this vulgar really fully kid who has her own problems greater than theirs ends up helping to get them to a place where they can continue their lives.
It was the greatest experience on a movie I have ever had. Everyone was tight and it was the greatest crew, Jake Scott, the director, is Ridley Scott’s son. For some reason on that one, I didn’t stop thinking all day. Now, keep in mind, I had a perfect upbringing, but I know what that feels in some way, to be this character. It was really hard. But they’re really funny and they make the most of it. They’re really great characters.


DD: Is that the best thing about being an actress, playing roles like that.

Kristen Stewart: That and also I meet so many amazing people and I get to work with my friends.

DD: You have any aspirations to do anything else?
Kristen Stewart: I know that will just naturally become other things, other than just acting in movies. I don’t know what the fuck I’m going to do. I write shit or whatever. I am going to make my own movies with my friends, absolutely, and I might not only act in them. But really? I love this, I love what I do, I am definitely going to keep doing it if I feel this way about it. That could stop, but until then, I’m just going to just write, make movies, play music.

Source: Dazed Digital

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Published in: on 19/08/2009 at 21:23  Leave a Comment  

Interview Magazine – Taylor Lautner

When rumors surfaced last year that 17-year-old Taylor Lautner would not appear in the Twilight sequel because he was too physically slight to portray a bookworm-turned-werewolf, a great shriek rose from Fangirl Island. “Noooooo!!” wrote one obsessive on a Twilight discussion board. “omg. Pleezze let Taylor come back,” implored another. Some were more militant: “If they don’t put him in . . . there will be a massive Twilight fan attack!”

The producers opted not to mess with their core constituency. While Twilight was ringing up $380 million at the box office and becoming one of the top pop-culture phenomena of the past year, Lautner was busy packing on 30 pounds of -muscle at the gym. His character, Jacob Black, the platonic best friend of heroine Bella Snow (played by Kristen Stewart), transforms in New Moon from a likable klutz into a member of a wolf pack. Likewise, the film gives Lautner a chance to bust out of more than his shirts, challenging co-star Robert Pattinson’s dominance of both the teen mags and the movie’s monster love-story narrative.

After an unusually chaotic post-release period that saw Pattinson shear off his -vampire hair (noooooo!), Stewart photographed on the steps of her L.A. apartment smoking what appeared to be weed, and director Catherine Hardwicke replaced by American Pie helmer Chris Weitz, the cast reunited—a lot more famous—in Vancouver last March to begin -filming New Moon. The sequel shakes up the central trio—teen vampire Edward (Pattinson), his devoted Bella, and her best friend Jacob—sending Edward packing, turning Jacob into a werewolf, and heating up the love–triangle element as Jacob makes a play for Bella in Edward’s absence. Frost/Nixon’s Michael Sheen joins the fray as a vampire leader, and the sequel’s scoreboard reads werewolves vs. vampires.

Lautner grew up in Michigan and L.A., a youthful karate star who transitioned at the age of 12 from martial arts to acting in benign cinematic family fare like The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl. He was excited to talk about shooting New Moon, dirt biking, his new set of muscles, and playing up the sexual tension.

MICHAEL MARTIN: How is the Twilight phenomenon sitting with you?

TAYLOR LAUTNER: It’s the weirdest thing. Nobody really saw it coming. I mean, we knew we were making a movie of a very popular book, but we didn’t know how well it was going to do. When it opened, it exploded, and that was not something any of us saw coming. Filming New Moon is a lot different than the first one because this time we know what we are getting into.

MARTIN: Do all the expectations psych you out?

LAUTNER: I don’t think so. It puts a little more pressure on us than it did before. But for the most part, it’s been a blast.

MARTIN: So what’s in store for Jacob?

LAUTNER: He’s a lot different than he was before. He transforms mid-story—in the first half, he’s Twilight Jacob. I’m wearing a wig. My character’s very clumsy, outgoing, and friendly. When he transforms into a werewolf, he becomes something very different. It’s like I’m playing a split personality. Which is tricky, because sometimes I’ve had to play pre- and post-transformation Jacob on the same day of filming.

MARTIN: Is the premise similar to the book’s?

LAUTNER: The coolest thing about the series is that we stay very true to the books; it would be silly for us not to, because the books are exactly what the fans want to see. There’s an action side to it, which I love, and there are werewolves now. There aren’t just vampires. There’s a wolf pack.

MARTIN: What does it mean to turn into a werewolf?

LAUTNER: I think the most important thing with Jacob is that pre-transformation, he’s clumsy. He trips over his own feet. As soon as he transforms, he’s very agile. At one point, he flings himself through Bella’s window and lands at her feet, and that’s the first time Bella realizes this is a new Jacob: He never used to be this agile. I loved bringing out that side of him. The bummer is, when he becomes a wolf, that’s not actually me. When he does the cool fight scenes, he’s transformed into CGI.

MARTIN: You had to bulk up for the part.

LAUTNER: Absolutely. As soon as I finished filming Twilight, I knew I had to get to work right away; there could be no waiting involved. The day I finished Twilight, I came home and started bulking up. For New Moon, I’m 30 pounds heavier than I was in Twilight.

MARTIN: Do you feel like you’re walking around in a different body?

LAUTNER: I don’t at all. I haven’t noticed much of a change. I grew out of a lot of my clothes, though. I went from a men’s small to a men’s large.

MARTIN: Are you turning more heads?

LAUTNER: I don’t know. I should pay more attention to that. I hope so.

MARTIN: What was your training regimen?

LAUTNER: I was in the gym five days a week, two hours a day. At one point, I was going seven days straight. I had put on a lot of weight, and then I started losing it drastically, so I was worried. It turned out I was overworking myself. My trainer told me that I couldn’t break a sweat, because I was burning more calories than I was putting on. The hardest thing for me was the eating. At one point I had to shove as much food in my body as possible to pack on calories. My trainer wanted me to do six meals a day and not go two hours without eating. If I would cheat on eating one day, I could tell—I’d drop a few pounds.

MARTIN: Are Twilight fans as intense as they seem?

LAUTNER: They are very intense, but it’s cool that they’re so dedicated and so passionate. They’re the reason we’re here doing this sequel. So I’m thankful for the fans. I like meeting them. But, yeah, they’re pretty intense. Sometimes it becomes a little overwhelming.

MARTIN: Do they scream and rend their garments?

LAUTNER: We’ve met many different fans: the criers, who come around quite often; the hyperventilators who stop breathing and have to have a medic come. We’ve definitely seen some passion.

MARTIN: How does it feel to be the source of that sort of worship?

LAUTNER: I don’t even know. I don’t know if it’s really hit me yet. They’re just passionate for the series and for the characters, and we’re just lucky enough to be a part of this. I don’t think it has much to do with me personally; it’s more because I’m playing the beloved Jacob Black.

MARTIN: Were you a Twilight fan before?

LAUTNER: I was not a vampire or werewolf fan at all. I’d never even heard of the series. I auditioned for the role, and as soon as I got it, I started reading the books. I’m not a reader, but I really did get hooked on them.

MARTIN: Do you hang out with Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart?

LAUTNER: The whole cast is really close. It would be difficult for our characters if we weren’t. It’s a love triangle, and we need to understand each other. So the fact that we’re close and can talk things through in rehearsals, and if we’re out at dinner, we’ll just randomly start talking about the scene we’re shooting the next day . . . If we weren’t able to do those things, I don’t know where we’d be.

MARTIN: What’s in store for that love triangle?

LAUTNER: Twilight develops the relationship between Edward and Bella. In New Moon, Edward leaves, and Bella needs someone to bring her out of this depression she’s in, so she turns to her best friend, Jacob. It looks like it could go past friends. Bella’s very confused. Jacob wants nothing more than to be more than friends. He wants Edward to get out of there so he can move in for the kill.

MARTIN: So to speak . . .

LAUTNER: Yeah. Bella’s torn. She’s still in love with Edward, but she’s kind of fallen for Jacob, too. When I read the books, I felt bad for Jacob, because he can’t have what he wants. I understand Jacob’s pain but also Bella’s pain—how she’s confused and torn between the two.

MARTIN: You understood that from personal experience?

LAUTNER: From getting into the character and being surrounded by these really talented actors.

MARTIN: What would you like to do next?

LAUTNER: I love action films. I’d love to do an action drama. I’m always looking to give my character something action-oriented to do.

MARTIN: Is the third Twilight movie happening, and are you in it?

LAUTNER: Yeah. We’re all staying focused on New Moon right now, but that’s in the back of our minds.

MARTIN: What would you be doing if not acting?

LAUTNER: I always played sports when I was young. I played football and baseball for eight years. I loved football. So maybe I’d be doing some kind of sport. I also loved writing and directing. So maybe that could be in my future too. I’d love to get into that.

MARTIN: You want to be a screenwriter?

LAUTNER: Possibly. Right now I’m an actor. But I could see that in my future.

MARTIN: You’ve got some time.

LAUTNER: Yeah, I’ve got a few years ahead of me.

Source: Interview Magazine

Published in: on 16/07/2009 at 20:29  Leave a Comment  

Jackson Rathbone talks women, cheating, and how to seal the deal for a second date with him!

Jackson Rathbone is a triple threat. An amazing actor, singer, and writer. Women can only imagine what Jackson might be looking for in a woman. Some might think that any woman he might take a second look at would have to be drop dead gorgeous. Wrong. Jackson opens up about his favorite features about women, dating advice, and how to seal the deal for a second date with him!

Gabrielle: What are qualities you look for in women?

Jackson: I look for a woman with a sincere smile and a love of the arts. I love being able to go out on crazy dates, like breaking into zoos after hours, so a woman who has a sense of adventure… but I also love a calm night of jamming on a beach at midnight with a bonfire, whiskey, and friends… so a woman who can hang in any situation and not get too clingy if I’m playing some music and spending time with my friends and family.

GC: In your opinion, what do men really notice about women?

JR: The way she carries herself. Many times, my friends and I will notice a girl who is beautiful, but just looks miserable in her demeanor. It’s a turn-off. Life’s too short.

GC: What is your ideal first date?

JR: Well, I live with the band I’m in, 100 Monkeys (100monkeysmusic.com), so I like to take a girl out to dinner alone, go for a walk and chat, and then come back to our “Monkey House” to see if she can hang with my friends/bandmates. If she’s cool to jam some tunes with us, shoot nerf guns at my bandmates’ heads, or at least not get offended when I pick up a guitar… then I know there’ll be a second date.

GC: What is a total deal-breaker?

JR: If a girl is involved with another guy. I don’t believe in the ideology of “if it’s a different area code, it’s not cheating,” I think that’s more of an “idiot-ology.” Too many times I’ve been hit on by a woman with a ring (engagement and/or wedding), and it disgusts me, to be frank. Even if a woman has a boyfriend she is about to break up with… to me, it’s wrong. I won’t even consider flirting with a woman unless she is completely single.

GC: What is your favorite feature about women?

JR: Everything. I am a lover, not a fighter. I don’t fuss over the fine points, I just love it all.

GC: How important is personality versus looks?

JR: I find the way that a woman walks, talks, and carries herself is more important to me than the way she dresses or make herself up. I don’t care how gorgeous she is if she knows it and shows it off too much; that woman is far too ostentatious and superficial for me. One of our band’s first singles is called “Ugly Girl” (available on iTunes) and it’s about a woman who sacrifices her personality for looks. To me, that makes any woman ugly.

GC: What’s sexier: A woman in a little black dress and heels, or a woman in sweat pants and a tank top?

JR: Depends what time of day. And where.

GC: In your opinion, what is the most important part of a relationship?

JR: Selflessness, honesty, and a healthy sexual attraction. I believe a sort of feral instinct takes place in any relationship that works… a sort of “pheromone cupid” strikes, if you will. From there, it’s all about keeping it honest and selfless. It takes two to tango, right?

GC: What is the worst dating advice you have ever taken?

JR: “Say whatever she wants to hear.” I forgot who told me that, but it’s complete bull-shenanigans. Trying to be what she wants is a terrible idea. I try to find a woman who I can be myself around, and who can be herself around me. I hate when relationships change people, but it happens… sometimes for good and sometimes for bad, but when two people fall in love and are still the same people, that’s true love. In my humble opinion.

GC: What first grabs your attention about a woman?

JR: Her eyes and her smile.

GC: Do you have any kind of hygiene regimen in the morning? Anything special you use on your skin, hair, etc?

JR: Haha! Nope. Just soap and water… I also brush my teeth with toothpaste, use deodorant, and I, occasionally, will shave.

GC: Do you prefer women with makeup or natural?

JR: Natural, mostly, but I’ve been known to be extremely attracted to the punk rock look. Though sometimes, it’s a little too much and you can’t tell how a woman will look when she wakes up; it’s really about whatever makeup makes her feel more like herself and more comfortable with who she is, not the other way around. In other words, a woman who defines her makeup and doesn’t let the makeup define her. Blonde or Brunette? —You forgot redhead. Tall or Petite? —In the words of Goldilocks, “just right.” Favorite eye color? —I’m color deficient… I like eyes that smile. Short hair or long hair? — I don’t have a preference, I guess… I’ve dated women with haircuts much shorter than my own and women with hair long enough to lasso the moon.

GC: Thank you Jackson!

JR: Thank you, Gabrielle!

Source: Examiner.com

Published in: on 24/06/2009 at 20:24  Leave a Comment  

Daniel Cudmore: Lexicon New Moon Interview

How would you characterize the New Moon audition process?
It was very unexpected for me. I had auditioned for one character and was called about a call-back for another character which somehow I had no idea about. Fortunately, I couldn’t make the call-back and had a chance to get it right and put it on tape. A week later I got the good news.

How would you characterize the make-up and costuming process?  Some of the actors have had difficulty with the contacts.  Did you find them difficult to use?  Did the costume help you find the character?
I found the whole process a lot of fun, I wear contacts normally so it wasn’t uncomfortable. The whole costumes when put together were so cool, and really helped with getting right into that character. It also helped that my skin was pretty much the same color as a vampire’s after a nice Vancouver winter.

How did you and the other Volturi and Guard cast members build your character relationships?
Charlie Bewley and I met at a costume fitting and got together a few days later for a coffee to chat about New Moon   We both have a very similar background and outlook on life so we got along right away, which helped with our characters since they’ve had quite a long working relationship and haven’t gotten sick of each other yet.

How did you prepare for the role of Felix?  Did you focus on a specific trait or idea as you prepared? You have talked about building back story for Felix. Can you give us some insight into that process and how you translated that to your scenes?
I definitely worked on this character for a while, I really liked his animalistic side and how good he is at what he does. I also worked out that his rage comes from jealousy, not having a power like the rest in the coven and Aro’s fascination with Edward fuels it even more. It was a fun character to play.

When we interviewed Charlie Bewley, he spoke about how your characters have a tag-team type of relationship in the movie. How would you describe Felix and Demetri?
Haha, very much bad cop good cop, except I really never interrogate, just rip vampires apart. It’s a great system they have and it’s worked for a while now.

We understand that you have done a lot of stunt work in the past. What is the coolest/most challenging stunt you have ever done, and did you enjoy your stunt work in New Moon?
I have been fortunate enough to do a lot of stunt work which has been a lot of fun and helped a lot with the fight scene on New Moon. I think the coolest stunt so far is this fight scene. It’s great to be the actor and getting to do all the fight choreography helps with the performance and really makes me feel a part of this character. I can’t wait for people to see it, JJ Makaro and his team put together a really cool fight and Simon Burnett (Rob Pattinson’s double) did such a great job.

What parts of filming did you find challenging (i.e. filming in front of a green screen, the makeup)? What was most enjoyable?
I think the shoot went really smoothly, the only thing would have to be the costume being really warm, so the long days of action work were a little sweaty. But it was all worth it once we got to film in Italy, it was gorgeous over there.

You had, no doubt, seen footage of the Twilight fan mania at some time. You started out filming in relatively low-key Vancouver, and went on to film in Italy. Did you expect so many fans? How would you characterize the experience of filming in Italy?
Haha, I’ve never seen anything like that. I thought they would have no idea who I was, but wow I was wrong. Filming there was such a great experience, I’m very fortunate to get to do things like that, with a great cast and crew.

Many of your roles have been in fantasy-based films. Do you prefer that genre? What is your dream role? What are some of your upcoming projects? Are you looking forward to the other Twilight Saga films?
I think it’s a very cool genre since all the characters are so imaginative. I’ve always wanted to be in a Bond film, I’m a huge fan of 007 and one of these days I’d like to get in one. I’m not locked into anything yet, there are some things in the works but the next film starts so soon, I might not have time for anything else.

Do you have anything more that you’d like to share with Twilight fans?
Just that it’s so great to be attached to this project because the fans are so passionate about it which is great to see, and I hope everyone enjoys New Moon as much as I did to film it.

Source: Twilight Lexicon

Published in: on 21/06/2009 at 14:48  Leave a Comment