Interview Magazine – Kellan Lutz

Actor, action-movie star, farmhand, Calvin Klein underwear model, and nascent motivational speaker, Kellan Lutz is the man of the moment. The determined 25-year-old Lutz has made a name for himself with roles as a cocky, good-looking jock with rich parents on CW’s 90210, a soldier stationed in Iraq in HBO’s Generation Kill (2008), and a vampire in the Twilight series—a trifecta of mainstream masculinity. He is a superhero-in-waiting, unbothered by an unbuttoned shirt, and thirsty for a franchise phenomenon of his own.

Born in North Dakota and raised in Arizona with frequent visits to the family farm in Iowa, Lutz has a backstory that is authentically rugged and thoroughly American—a Bruce Weber–esque narrative that became an actual Bruce Weber narrative in 2004 when Lutz appeared, photographed by Weber, on the cover of the A&F Quarterly magazine. But it’s Hollywood time now, and Lutz is hard at work. There’s this month’s A Nightmare on Elm Street remake; a turn as a hotheaded lacrosse player opposite fellow Twilight-er Ashley Greene in Warrior; the independent murder mystery Meskada with Nick Stahl and Grace Gummer; and then, most importantly, more Twilight (the third installment, Eclipse, is out in June). Lutz believes in paying it forward and the laws of attraction. Even stray pups follow him home.

MARK JACOBS: Hi, Kellan? Where are you right now?

KELLAN LUTZ: I am in my backyard in L.A. hanging out with my two dogs.

JACOBS: Who are your dogs?

LUTZ: Kola is a shepherd-husky mix I adopted from the Compton animal shelter. Kevin is the newest, most adorable member of our family. He’s a Chihuahua. I found him on the street when I came back from one of my trips.

JACOBS: You spent time on a dairy farm in Iowa while you were growing up?

LUTZ: Iowa is where the big farm was, where my grandparents lived. After my parents divorced, we would visit them. My mom would send me out to the pigpen, where we had these huge, huge pigs. I would stand there for six hours holding a hose, watering pigs. They’d dive in the mud and shake it off, and I’d go home covered in it. I loved the whole thing of getting wet and dirty and then getting in a warm bath.

JACOBS: You also have experience spraying crops and building silos. Are you aware of how this story reads in New York and L.A.? Anything involving uncontrived hard labor is irresistible to the style industry.

LUTZ: I’d rather do manual labor than sit behind a desk. And as my grandparents got older, I’d fly out there and help out around the farm. We’d tear barns down; we’d build barns. I’d rather be outside rolling hay or driving the tractors.

JACOBS: Then how did you choose Hollywood?

LUTZ: I have a lot of older brothers who messed up in different ways in my mother’s eyes. So I learned from all of their mistakes. I can’t go into detail, but while I was growing up, I always tried to make it a goal to relieve some of the stress my mother went through. I applied myself to school very diligently. I wanted to go out of state so I wouldn’t have to depend on my mother. And L.A., where my father lived, seemed to call to me.

JACOBS: Why acting?

LUTZ: In L.A., I was meeting people who were all actors. My mind started to open up to what acting was. I didn’t realize that Brad Pitt was a real person. I didn’t think he was a robot or a machine, but I thought you were just born into acting—that it’s a family tree, kind of like NASCAR. No one can just say, “Hey, I’m going to be a

NASCAR driver.” They need to have some way in. Once I was in L.A., I realized anyone could do this. Why not give it a shot? I started going to a ton of acting classes, and I found I had a real passion for it, probably the biggest passion I’ve ever had in my whole life. So I decided to put school aside, put all my scholarships aside, put everything that I worked hard on for my mother and myself aside, and pursue this roller-coaster ride.

JACOBS: How old were you when you got the -Abercrombie & Fitch cover?

LUTZ: Eighteen. I was actually working in L.A. at an Abercrombie to make friends. I had no friends.

JACOBS: On the sales floor?

LUTZ: I was selling clothes. But I believe my personality helped, because I was the worst folder. I just couldn’t care to do it. I felt like I had ADD. I would just goof around and shoot rubber bands everywhere. Somehow the manager didn’t fire me, and I became a greeter, when you have to stand outside, you know, topless, and kind of finagle people into the store. Then Abercrombie had an audition, and my agency sent me out. I met Bruce Weber, and they chose me. I wasn’t the strongest, most fit, best-looking guy on that shoot, but somehow Bruce put me on the cover. I was just lying on the grass playing with this beetle, and they used that shot. I was still working at the store when the magazine came out two months later. I was just very lucky, and that opened up doors to acting.

JACOBS: Unlike some actors, you don’t seem to have a need to distance yourself from modeling.

LUTZ: It’s weird that the world sees modeling as a negative. It just blows my mind how many people think that because I was a model, I think I’m pretty and that I can use my looks to get ahead. I’m not pretty!

JACOBS: You really don’t think you’re pretty?

LUTZ: It’s funny when people say you have sex appeal or call you the next Brad Pitt. I just laugh. I’m not that. I don’t want to be that. “You’re a sex icon.” Why? Because I played a vampire in a movie? It’s all very unearned. If I had the best freaking abs in the world or if I looked like Brad Pitt does in Fight Club [1999], then cool, but I’m not starving myself. I eat what I want, and I’m not a workout fiend. My genetics are good, but they aren’t crazy He-Man style. I don’t get it, but I appreciate it. [laughs]

JACOBS: And sometimes you just like to go on a shirtless run with your dog, and people need to deal with it.

LUTZ: I don’t see why it’s special. I know a lot of people who run shirtless because they don’t want their clothes to get sweaty. I’m just a normal person. And I have four paparazzi who sit outside my house all day.

JACOBS: Your humility is charming, but do you ever look at other guys going up for a role and think, “I can destroy you with my good looks”?

LUTZ: I love competition. I thrive on it. I love being able to win the room over before even walking through the door. When I was going out for Twilight, I was a big guy, especially after Generation Kill. I was close to 200 pounds and just all muscle. The character description was a big, bulky fighter, a wrestler, a bear of a guy with a smile. I walked in the waiting room and I noticed nine other actors, and half of them were trying to do push-ups, and half of them were trying to be all tough. I chuckled to myself. I’m very perceptive. I love seeing guys out of the corner of my eye be like, “Great.” Because they see a guy walking in who totally looks the role. It’s funny. I don’t try to be cocky, but I’m just very confident because I know I did all of my homework. I also really love, love, love doing character pieces. I love wearing wigs to auditions, even though sometimes they don’t work. I love trying to play the not-confident guy, the guy against my normal character, because that’s when real acting comes into play.

JACOBS: So you have four very different films coming up.

LUTZ: I’ve had a great run with great projects. Especially the new ones. I love this industry. It keeps you young; it really does.

JACOBS: You’re pretty young.

LUTZ: I’ll always see myself as young at heart. I mean, I’m 25, and some people see that as getting up there.

JACOBS: Who’s telling you you’re getting up there?

LUTZ: People are saying that you can’t play high school anymore and I’m like, “Thank god.” I want to be the Jason Bourne type. I don’t want to play high school.

JACOBS: You’re unapologetic about wanting to be an action star.

LUTZ: It’s all about goals. If you just take whatever comes to you, then you’re not going to get anywhere. The more you say it around town or in meetings, it starts happening. That’s what’s going on right now. People are seeing me as the guy who wants to get hurt, who wants to break a bone, get bruises. And that’s how it was growing up with six brothers. I got beat up, and I beat up people. I have no real tattoos. I wear my bruises and tons of scars as my -tattoos. And I’ve grown up loving action movies. I’d love to work with Sylvester Stallone, and I almost had the chance to in The Expendables [out August 2010], but that didn’t work out because of scheduling. I’d love to work with him and Mickey Rourke, Matt Damon, Daniel Craig, Jason Statham, Jet Li, Jean-Claude Van Damme. . . . Bloodsport [1988] was one of my favorite movies. I feel like there’s only so many roles out there and such a surplus of actors that if you don’t have a goal, you just get lost.

JACOBS: You’ve covered your bases. You even did a Hilary Duff video [“With Love”].

LUTZ: My agent and my girlfriend at the time both wanted me to go out for the audition. There’s a quote, I think it’s Wayne Gretzky, that says you miss 100 percent of the shots you never take. That’s so true. That’s why I love going out for any audition. I’m very professional, I study my stuff, I work on it, and even if I’m not right for the job, so what? I know I did my best.

JACOBS: You keep getting roles because you’re a talented actor and you’re dedicated to what you do.

LUTZ: I’ve got a lot to learn, and I’m very blessed to work with such talented actors. I’m nowhere near my goal. It’s all about applying yourself and taking time to work and train. I want to be doing this until the day I die. I want to be in movies and working with people who push me to be a better actor. That’s what I look forward to, and that’s what’s important to me. I just want to test out all that Kellan is and push him to the limits and create new Kellans.

Source: Interview Magazine

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Published in: on 15/04/2010 at 19:24  Leave a Comment  

Twilight’s Shining Star, Ashley Greene

Once upon a time, the Twilight book series was the equivalent of literary crack for impressionable tweens, fantasizing about the forbidden love between vampire and delectable human.

Fast forward a couple years, and Twilight mania has swept the nation in cinematic form, allowing fans to finally assign faces to their beloved Edward Cullen and Bella Swan. Pandemonium continues to gain steam as fans young and old indulge their thirst for blood and romance and the excitement will surely be at an alltime high with the latest installment of the series, New Moon, set for release this November. But while veteran heartthrobs Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart have been at the forefront of the Twilight craze, stars like Ashley Greene, better known as the psychic, pixie-like vampire Alice Cullen in the film series, are still adapting to newfound fame. In fact, Greene, a Jacksonville native, was practically a newbie to the scene before landing the role that changed her life. Even our photo shoot, held at West Hollywood’s Coco de Ville / STK, was the starlet’s very first cover shoot. After a day spent amidst designer gowns, camera crews and the comic relief of Greene’s adorable pup, Marlo, Greene took a moment to come up for air and catch us up on life spent in Twilight.


Could you tell us about the new Twilight movie, New Moon?

It was fun for me because it was a little more in-depth for Alice’s character. It’s more about the angst part of it than the love story as far as Edward and Bella. Edward leaves Bella, so she kind of falls into a depression and gets close to Jacob, and discovers a couple more crazy things about the town. We had a blast filming. We got to go to Italy, which was amazing. It was a couple of us who got to go to Italy, and I was included. It was coming back to the people we got really close to in the movie before so it was like a little reunion. And Chris Weitz directed it, and he was incredible. I feel like the set was so chill and really comfortable, and it seemed like it was all very planned out and very put together so we weren’t going crazy and stressing out. I’m excited to see it all put together. I’m really confident that it will be good.

What was it like reuniting with the Twilight cast again?
Coming back to the second one was really great because we already had this relationship so we got to build on top of that. I feel like I was really close with a couple of people and then on the second one, I got close with a couple of different people, so it’s been really fun.

What was the process of being cast for the role of Alice? Were you familiar with the book series beforehand?
It was a really long, tedious process. I hadn’t read the books, but I read them because they wouldn’t release the script or breakdown. My manager told me to go into the audition and to do a good job and not to mess up because the casting directors were sticklers. So, I was like, “How am I supposed to do a good job? I don’t even know what I’m supposed to be playing!” I originally auditioned for Bella, and so I read the first book and kind of fell in love with it. I went in and auditioned and actually they called me back in and said, “No, you’re not right for Bella,” so I was bummed, and then they brought me back for Alice. I worked more on it – that was all I did for a couple of days before I went in. I came in probably like five times before I actually got the role – and then I went home for Christmas and literally just had to wait and wait. I thought that I didn’t get it again, and then I got the call that I was Alice and I freaked out and called my dad and mom.

Did you have any idea, going into it, that it would have this much fan appeal? Did you feel any pressure to deliver, or did that just develop over the course of making the film and its release?
I did because it was really my first film where I had a bigger part and was a studio thing – I was nervous. I think I was more nervous than most of the cast because it was my first thing. It definitely kept building and turned into kind of a different type of nervousness. We knew that it was probably going to go to theaters because so
many people love the books, and in the course of filming we realized that it probably wasn’t just going to go to theaters, it was going to do quite well. Then [the film] opened really, really huge, which was incredible.

Do you tend to have more guy fans or more girl “tween” fans?
I definitely get more girls. There’s been guys – I’m used to the girls, so with the guys I’m kind of awkward, I feel like. But, some of them are really sweet.

Do you prefer that people come up to you and say something when you’re recognized? That’s something fans always wonder.
Before, it was just like one or two people and I totally would rather them come up [to me] because I think it’s really sweet. They say hello and I go back to what I’m doing and it’s better than having them just stare the whole time because then you feel like you’re being watched and then you’re not really comfortable. But, it’s getting to be more and more people, so I don’t know. If everyone wants to come up and say hello… I guess I’m going to leave it up to them. It’s working fine now. I’m not going mess up the process.

What do you make of this Robert Pattinson craze? It’s starting to get to the point where the pandemonium is putting him in dangerous situations. What’s your take on that?
It’s sad for Rob! It’s a hard thing because we absolutely adore our fans, and he does too, and they helped us get to where we are now so you have to be thankful for that. I applaud him – with my fan encounters, there’s a process. It’s kind of like this chisel effect where there’s one and then it’s two and then it’s five, so I was kind of able to ace it. But he got slapped with 25,000 screaming girls so I definitely think he’s taking it in stride. They love him so much and I know they don’t want to hurt him, but people just don’t realize that when they’re that many people coming with a force, it can be very dangerous sometimes.

Now that you are in the public eye, how do you deal with people speculating about your personal life all the time?
It’s kind of laughable because it’s amazing that people are so intrigued by who I have lunch with and whatnot. This is my thing: If I was in a relationship with someone that I really cared about, it would upset me if they speculated something about me and someone else because that other person has to read it. That’s the part which I haven’t encountered yet because I’m not in a relationship, but I’m just waiting for it – and then I’m sure I’ll hate it. It’s something I have to get used to, I guess. It’s all apart of this job. It’s like the little fine print of dating me – “You will now be thrown into this Twilight whirlwind.” The fans embrace everything that we do, so if I started dating some guy they would probably embrace him too.

How has it been with the other Twilight castmates? Is there anyone on set that you happen to be closer with?
Kellan [Lutz] and I are very close. I have different relationships with different people – and it’s really great, I kind of get the best of everything. Rachelle [Lefevre] and I have this, like, zest for life. She and I can just go and have a glass of wine and unwind, and we work out together and stuff like that so she and I have that kind of relationship – I think we’re both easygoing, fun people. Kristen [Stewart] and I recently got closer. I feel like in the first film, we were friends, but with our schedule we were never in the same place at the same time. So, with the second one, it was more intimate as far as the amount of people involved. After the first week or two of production, it was just me, Kristen, Rob and Taylor [Lautner], and then Rachelle was there for a little bit. Taylor’s super, super sweet, and Jackson [Rathbone], I adore. I love them all. They’re great.

Do you ever worry about being always thought of as Alice Cullen when you go off to make your other film projects? What kind of other projects are you hoping to do?
Maybe Kristen and Rob will kind of have a little bit more of a shadow behind them that always links them to Twilight, but Alice is a vampire, yes, but she has this human heart. She’s really lovable and really likable, sort of
like the best friend, and so I think that might help me in the other films. I think the fans already love me and love Alice. I think it’s a positive. I don’t think I’m going to be pigeonholed. If I always played the hot, stupid chick, then I might be pigeonholed as that. I get to kind of choose my films, which hopefully I will choose wisely and
build off of that versus pissing the fans off. I want to do an action film just because there’s already a bit of action in Twilight, and when I did it I absolutely took to it and loved it.

When we see these other film series based off of books, like Harry Potter, that have gone on and on with multiple installments of the films – is that now something that you’re totally prepared to take on?
Yeah. I know Harry Potter went on – it’s still going on – for a really long time. These kids basically grew up in these films. But with ours, we can’t age, so that’s the big difference. We have to get [the films] done. We filmed the second one and we’re about to jump into the third. I’m not sure about the fourth one yet – but I’m assuming that we’re going to get that one done in a timely manner as well. I think we’ll film them, and then how they want to release them is up to their discretion. At least we’ll be able to have this Twilight force behind us for a while, but I think the filming will be done fairly soon. So, we’ll get to have the best of both worlds because we’ll actually be free to film other projects in between. That’s the other thing that I think is huge with Twilight – usually people don’t have the time or are not allowed to contractually do other films, but they’re letting us do other films in between.


When you’re not filming, what do you do for fun?

I definitely try to make it home. I actually have my family fly out, and I have a couple of Florida friends fly out sometimes, and then I have a best friend or two in L.A. I just try hanging out and spending time with my friends – I try and live a normal lifestyle.

What would be your ideal Saturday night?
Me and my friends are really big on doing game nights. We just grab a couple of games and sometimes we order in or sometimes we just get a bunch of cheese and crackers and stuff like that or cook dinner, and just hang out and play games.

By Jillian Gordon

Source: Saturday Night Magazine

Published in: on 23/09/2009 at 20:31  Leave a Comment  

100 Monkeys Exclusive Interview

When we were growing up, we thought ten little monkeys could get themselves into enough trouble for all of us…jumping on the bed and whatnot.

But now there’s 100 Monkeys, and they’re just as impulsive and unpredictable. The West Coast band comprised of Jacksone Rathbone (a.k.a. Jasper Hale of the “Twilight” saga), Ben Graupner, Ben Johnson, and Jared Anderson has found success across the country with their unique improv style of music.

Categorized on their MySpace page as a combination of “Japanese classic music, 2-step, psychobilly” which may be good enough or equally perplexing descriptors as any, the 100 Monkeys are currently touring throughout the summer with their debut CD Monster De Lux.

Just listen for the shouted deluge of audience improv suggestions or follow the trail of over-excited, collapsed Twi-hards, and you’ll be sure to find them.

Meanwhile, StarShine caged the jovial, bantering Monkeys (sans Ben J.) for an exclusive interview in which they discuss stage life, Twilight mania, obscure global theorems, and humpback whales.

What’s the origin of the 100 Monkeys?

Jackson: The 100 Monkeys started with Ben G. and I–like 3 years ago–whenever he moved to L.A. We were roommates back in high school. We knew Ben J. back then, and we started the band as a two-man group just doing improv music and trying to get Ben J. out to Los Angeles to make some music with us. Along the way, we happened to meet up with Jared Anderson who we would jam with all the time. Now we all are together in harmony. It’s fantastic.

Ben G: It’s like an MTV reality show.

Would you ever do one of those?

Jackson: No, that would make even more drama out of what little drama there is.

Jared: If it was a Discovery Channel reality show, yes.

Speaking of the Discovery Channel, why did you choose to name the band after “The Hundredth Monkey Effect,” which per your MySpace page, “generally describes the instant, paranormal spreading of an idea or ability to the remainder of a population once a certain portion of that population has heard of the new idea or learned the new ability”?

Jackson: That was one part of it, and [that idea] if you get 100 monkeys in the room with 100 typewriters, eventually they’ll create the works of Shakespeare. (See: Infinite Monkey Theorem) It’s the certain style of music we make and the music we write.

If you came up with your own Monkey Effect, what idea would you like to impart on society?

Ben G: Wow!

Jackson: We’re really trying to get people into the Spencer Bell Memorial. (www.spencerbellmemorial.com) It’s a benefit for adrenal cancer research and our friend Spencer Bell, who was our greatest influence in all of our music. He passed away about three years ago, so we’re just working, trying to keep his memory alive and keep his music out to the masses. We were able to raise money to put out one of his albums, and we have 3 more because of the fan support that we’ve been getting. It’s just incredible.

Why have you chosen to use improv in your music?

Jared: I think because we started as actors, most of us, minus Ben J. Improv is part of acting, so we all love doing it. We play well off each other, and we do take straight-up audience suggestions and make up a song on the spot, even all the instrumental parts.

Just then, the sound of piano keys interrupts his thought as the boys chime in, singing and playing notes, “It’s a song that we’re singing for the very first time…” Over just as soon as it started, they jump back on the interview train –

Jackson: See, genius! Where inspiration takes you, it takes you hard. If you take the drummer and the drummer starts playing bass and the singer starts singing backup vocals, you find a whole new bunch of stuff in the music that you might not find if you didn’t allow yourself the freedom to change the lyrics once in a while or completely make up a song.

Jared: It’s called the 100 Monkeys Switcheroo.

Ben G: We increase each other’s talents.

Jackson: We all come from different backgrounds and ways of learning music. It’s really interesting, and it’s really cool to have that diversity ‘cause when it comes together, it creates this union of –

Jared: – magic. A union of magic.

Jackson: Sometimes it sounds awful…but still magic. Sometimes it sounds good. (laughs)

Can everyone play all of the instruments?

Ben G: Not yet, but almost. People have their strengths. Everybody specializes I think in probably two things.

Jackson: We wanna give the audience a show. We love our fans. We love performing, and we feel that when you come to our show, you’re gonna get to hear a song that’s never going to be played live again. People always come up to us at the end of shows requesting other improv songs.

Jared: I actually feel like we owe it to ‘em after a while because they’re like demanding, and I’m like, “I don’t know how!” I’m like, “Let’s just suck it up and learn it!”

Given that three out of the four of you are also actors, do you have a preference between music and acting?

Jackson: I wanna have my cake and eat it too. I wanna do both. I think the way we figure it, it feeds both sides of the creative process.

To feed the elephant in the room, Jackson, can you tease anything about “New Moon” for the yearning “Twilight” fans out there?

Jackson: It’s gonna be raging…action-packed, more steamy romance. You get to see a lot more crazy stuff happening. We went deeper into the world now, and it’s gonna be a fun thrill ride for everyone.

Also, filming recently wrapped in Pennsylvania for M. Night Shyamalan’s “The Last Airbender.” What was that experience like, Jackson?

Jackson: It’s been incredible, a great set. I really believe we’re making a film that’s going to be epic. It’s gonna move people. I think the movie’s gonna turn out beautiful.

The 100 Monkeys have performed with Rob Pattinson in the past. Any chance that’ll be a recurring collaboration?

Jackson: Well, I mean, Rob’s a busy guy…(laughs) We’ve had a few chances to play with him. He’s an awesome musician.

How has “Twilight” mania affected the band’s popularity?

Jackson: It’s definitely gotten us some attention, but I think the main thing is our lives shows. People get to –

Jared: – escape into a fun land. Enjoy good music.

Jackson: Yeah, we like to have a good time. That’s what we’re always trying to do – play music for as many people as possible.

Jared: Hopefully, they come in ready to rock out and have some fun. That’s all you can expect.

Ben G: If you scream loud enough, we’ll make up a song that you decide what it’s called. Things like guitar picks and sweat.

Jackson: We like to give things away a lot on stage.

Jared: Sometimes we bring monkeys and throw them into the crowd.

Jackson: By the way, Ben J. is an adamant whale enthusiast. I know that if he were here, he would want to mention something about preserving the humpback whale in particular. Just figured I’d throw that in there.

One thing’s for certain, you’ll never know what the 100 Monkeys will say…in person…or on stage.

Visit www.myspace.com/these100monkeys or www.100monkeysmusic.com for upcoming tour dates and information.

Source: StarShine Magazine

Published in: on 07/07/2009 at 19:17  Leave a Comment  

Bienvenue

Bienvenue sur le blog réservé aux articles, interviews du cast de Twilight

Stephanie

Published in: on 21/06/2009 at 11:34  Leave a Comment